Prepare for the Worst and Hope for the Best

Written on .

Last week, an EF-3+ tornado touched down in the city where I live, so it is not surprising that the concept of disaster preparedness is on my mind. (Thankfully, my family and I suffered no damage).

Is your business prepared if a disaster were to strike? And is your business required by OSHA to have a written emergency action plan?

According to OSHA, an emergency action plan (EAP) is intended to facilitate and organize employer and worker actions during workplace emergencies and is recommended for all employers. Well-developed emergency plans and proper worker training (i.e., so that workers understand their roles and responsibilities within the plan) will result in fewer and less severe worker injuries and less damage to the facility during emergencies. A poorly prepared plan may lead to a disorganized evacuation or emergency response, resulting in confusion, injury, illness (due to chemical, biological and/or radiation exposure), and/or property damage.

Two OSHA standards (29 CFR 1910.38(a) and 29 CFR 1926.35) require written EAPs. Not all employers are required to establish an EAP but developing an EAP is a good way to protect workers and businesses during an emergency. Emergency preparedness is a well-known concept in protecting workers’ safety and health.

At a minimum, for businesses that are required to to have an EAP, the plan must include:

  • A preferred method and/or procedures for reporting fires and other emergencies (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(1) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(5));
  • Emergency escape procedures and route assignments, such as floor plans, workplace maps, and safe or refuge areas (example shown below) (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(2) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(1));
  • Procedures to account for all workers after an evacuation, such as designating an assembly location (e.g., a safe/refuge area) (29 CFR 1910.38(b)(4) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(3))
  • Names, titles, departments, and telephone numbers of individuals both within and outside the company to contact for additional information or explanation of duties and responsibilities under the emergency plan (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(6) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(6));
  • Procedures for workers who remain to perform or shut down critical plant operations, operate fire extinguishers, or perform other essential services that cannot be shut down for every emergency alarm before evacuating (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(3) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(2)); and
  • Rescue and medical duties for any workers designated to perform them (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(5) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(4)).
  • Names, titles, departments, and telephone numbers of individuals both within and outside the company to contact for additional information or explanation of duties and responsibilities under the emergency plan (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(6) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(6));
  • Procedures for workers who remain to perform or shut down critical plant operations, operate fire extinguishers, or perform other essential services that cannot be shut down for every emergency alarm before evacuating (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(3) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(2)); and
  • Rescue and medical duties for any workers designated to perform them (29 CFR 1910.38(c)(5) and 29 CFR 1926.35(b)(4)).

And don’t forget to perform regular evacuation drills so that employees actually know what to do and where to go in the event of an emergency.

Kathleen J. Jennings
Principal | Email: kjj@wimlaw.com
Kathleen J. Jennings is a principal in the Atlanta office of Wimberly, Lawson, Steckel, Schneider, & Stine, P.C. She defends employers in employment matters, such as sexual harassment, discrimination, Wage and Hour, OSHA, restrictive covenants, and other employment litigation and provides training and counseling to employers in employment matters.

Get Email Updates

Receive newsletters and alerts directly in your email inbox. Sign up below.

Recent Content

microphone, indoors

Union Organizing Efforts across the Country Continue to Draw Attention

Recent Gallup polls indicate that the public has a favorable opinion of unions with a near record high of 68%, and with the "great resign...
supreme court of the united states

Supreme Court Explains Limits to Arbitration Exceptions to Court Litigation

A majority of employees in the U.S. are now covered by individual arbitration agreements prohibiting them from bringing lawsuits in court...
bullseye target, darts

10 Things That Might Make Your Company an Attractive Target to a Plaintiff's Lawyer

Wimberly & Lawson attorneys Kathleen Jennings, Paul Oliver, and Jim Wimberly conducted a webinar on June 2, 2022, dealing with the ab...
person completing documents, indoors on a table with a mug

Employer Wins Lawsuit over Background Checks Even Though It Failed to Show Applicant Copy of the Report

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) places a number of obligations on employers who use third-party background or credit check companies...
interview between a man and woman indoors

E17: The Bad Job Interview

In this episode, host Thom Jennings and attorney Kathleen Jennings discuss a Reddit post about a job interview that went terribly wrong. ...

Wimberly, Lawson, Steckel, Schneider & Stine

3400 Peachtree Road, Ste 400 / Lenox Towers / Atlanta, GA 30326 /404.365.0900

Where Experience Counts


Thank you for visiting the firm's website. Please note that this website is intended for general information purposes only and does not constitute an offer of representation or create an attorney-client relationship with the firm. The firm welcomes receipt of electronic mail but the act of sending electronic mail alone does not create an attorney-client relationship. You may reproduce materials available at this site for your own personal use and for non-commercial distribution. All copies must include the firm's copyright notice.

© 2022 Wimberly, Lawson, Steckel, Schneider & Stine P.C. | Site By JSM