Articles

indoors, office
As COVID restrictions ease, many employers are deciding whether to require employees who have been working remotely to come back to the office. So can an employer fire employees who refuse to come back to the office? Yes–with some important exceptions.
signing agreement
Today, the President issued an Executive Order broadly tackling the issue of competition in the marketplace. One of the particular issues that the FTC has been tasked with is to restrict the use of non-competition agreements that have become common in certain industries and limit worker mobility. In addition, several states have enacted laws that restrict...
bathroom sign, male and female
Last week, on the first anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, in which the Court held that Title VII’s prohibition on discrimination on the basis is “sex” encompasses sexual orientation and transgender status, the EEOC issued some updated guidance regarding the treatment of transgender employees in the workpla...
supreme court building, blue sky, sunset
One of the most eagerly anticipated decisions coming from the U.S. Supreme Court this term was Fulton v. Philadephia, a case involving a Catholic charity’s challenge to a Philadelphia ordinance that excluded it from part of the city’s foster-care program because the charity would not help place children with same-sex couples. The charity argued that ...
nurse looking at the camera indoors with a hairnet and mask
Today, the Department of Labor released the long-awaiting OSHA Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) for dealing with COVID-19. This ETS applies to all settings where any employee provides healthcare services or healthcare support services.
vaccine extraction indoors
Late last week, just before most of us enjoyed a long holiday weekend, the EEOC issued some additional guidance addressing questions arising under the federal equal employment opportunity laws in regard to employees and COVID vaccinations. Considering that the distribution of vaccines started in February, the EEOC is a little late to the party, but better...
woman using a laptop next to a stethescope indoors on a table
A lot of people talk about HIPAA, but how many of them have actually read the law? Not very many, from what I have seen and heard people say about HIPAA. Let’s set the record straight.
Vaccine Clinic parking
Today, the CDC issued new guidance regarding persons who have been fully vaccinated aganst COVID-19. Now, fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear a mask or physically distance in any setting, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance...
exit sign
Now is a great time to review your company’s emergency action plan.  Why?  We have the Atlantic hurricane season starting on June 1, and we have more workers returning to the physical workplace from their remote locations, thanks to mass vaccination.  So let’s make sure everyone knows what to do in the event of an emergency.  Note also...
counting cash, indoors
Today, to absolutely no one’s surprise, U.S. the Department of Labor formally withdrew the Independent Contractor Rule that had been implemented by the previous administration. The withdrawal is effective on May 6, 2021. After a long, strange trip, the Rule never went into effect. It should be noted, however, that some employer groups have filed a lawsuit...
a couple embracing outside while wearing masks
By all accounts, the number of COVID-19 infections (and deaths) are on the rise and are likely to increase even more after Thanksgiving. At the same time, there is a great political divide as to how seriously folks take the virus. Politics aside, what are some of the potential costs to your business if you fail to take COVID-19 seriously? As an initial m...

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